Metal · Reviews

Review: Ensiferum – One Man Army

My review of One Man Army, written for Rock’n’Reel Reviews.

OneManArmy

A lot of metal’s appeal has always been the sense of escapism it provides. It’s the fantasy, encouraged by musicians through their dramatic and elaborate concepts, that sometimes has as much to do with alluring listeners as the music itself.

Perhaps that’s why so many enjoy folk metal. Because even if the music is sub-par, hordes of fans lap it up for the mythical references, the dramatics, advocacy for alcohol and tongue-in-cheek approach.

Finland’s Ensiferum are a shining example to rise from the genre, with a fourteen year run proving their talent. Album six, One Man Army, is the epitome of how heavy metal and folk instrumentals can be unified to great effect.

Guitarist and primary songwriter Markus Toivonen and his bandmates have done a great job on this one. The versatility and colour within the music speaks for itself; every track possessing its own memorable melodies, story and emotional delivery.

The more obviously inspired folk, multi-instrumental songs are dispersed throughout the album and performed as usual by keyboardist Emmi Silvennoinen. Intro ‘March of War’ is the first example, before the listener is hurled into ‘Axe of Judgement’, a stark, speedy contrast to enter battle with.

Later tracks like ‘Heathen Horde’, ‘Cry for the Earth Bounds’ and ‘Two of Spades’ are worth picking out for the their uniqueness and startling contrast in comparison to each other. There’s definitely a lot to experience throughout the album. Who knows, maybe even the cynics will allow themselves to be taken in by it.

Personal Score: 4/5

Metal · Reviews

Review: In Flames – Siren Charms

About once a year, give or take, I fall in love with In Flames all over again and listen to their back-catalogue continuously. Here’s my review of their latest release.

SirenCharms

If fans of In Flames are to stand any chance of enjoying Siren Charms, they’d better embrace change and accept the band’s ongoing evolution into milder realms. Perspective is key when assessing this release. Alone, the Swedes’ eleventh creation is a decent piece of work, but frankly it’s an utter disappointment in light of their past and a painful reminder that their firey, melo-death metal foundation has been truly extinguished.

Whilst remnants of the band’s core sound are present, through their ability to engage the listener with signature atmospheric highs and lows, on the whole the latest offering feels frustratingly tame. A softer, slower musical approach runs throughout and demonstrates a permanent trajectory into rock, even borderline pop at times. Siren Charms is incredibly easy on the ears.

The title-track captures this shift in style and energy perfectly. Anders Friden’s soft, emotive singing voice draws the listener in with a feeling of heartfelt authenticity, as though he’s revealing true secrets and builds up to a soulful, crashing chorus. The following track ‘When the World Explodes’ is one of the heavier picks and compliments its predecessor. Growls return to the fold and a rhythmic metalcore style dominates. Guest vocalist Emilia Feldt also lends her delicate vocals to wrap up the album’s mid-section; the most interesting, mysterious and indeed charming.

Nevertheless, there are far too many songs here that are mediocre. Thrills are scarce, unfortunately. And knowing what wondrous sound and invention In Flames are actually capable of means that this reality is a little hard to bear. The album does possess a certain subtle character, however. One can only hope that it’ll introduce new listeners to the versatile beauty of this acclaimed band.

Personal Score: 3/5